Blac Chyna Slammed With Lawsuit Over Unpaid Rent and Property Damage

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Blac Chyna Slammed With Lawsuit Over Unpaid Rent and Property Damage
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In addition to owing her former landlord, Michael Krekerman, $55,546 for five months of rent, the Lashed Bar owner owes him $18,000 for allegedly removing ‘fixtures and equipment’ from the home.

AceShowbiz
Less than a month after Blac Chyna and Rob Kardashian reached an agreement in their child support case, the former has gotten herself in trouble with the law. Words are, the Lashed Bar owner is sued over unpaid rent and damages to property. TMZ first reported the news.

According to the news outlet, Chyna’s former landlord, Michael Krekerman, claimed that she rented a mansion in Studio City, California from April 2017, adding that she signed the lease agreeing that she would occupy the property until March 2019. However, she allegedly moved out in November last year and stopped paying the rent ever since.

In addition to that, the video vixen allegedly removed “fixtures and equipment” from the home which the landlord claimed caused $18,000 in damages. As for the unpaid rent itself, Krekerman said that she owes him $55,546 for five months of rent. After deducting her $25,000 deposit and adding on the cost in damages, he said that Chyna owes $48,546, excluding plus interest and attorney’s fees.

This arrived after Chyna and Rob came to an agreement in their custody battle. According to the documents, the former “Rob & Chyna” co-stars agreed that neither of them would pay the other any child support. They would only pay for all Dream’s expenses when she is in their custody. As for the little girl’s “medical insurance premiums, any insured emergency or routing medical care, and any mutually agreed upon pre-school or private school,” Rob and Chyna would split the cost evenly.

Furthermore, the Arthur George sock designer and his ex-fiancee would take turns claiming Dream as a dependent on their taxes. The documents noted that the exes agreed to the other as it “is in the minor child’s best interest, and adequately meets the minor’s child reasonable needs.”



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