Trump calls off tariff threat against Mexico which will deploy national guard to its southern border | US News

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Donald Trump has called off his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican imports, as Mexico pledges to clamp down on migration to the US.

The American president said the tariffs, which were due to be introduced on Monday, would be “suspended indefinitely”.

In a joint declaration outlining details of their deal, the two countries said Mexico agreed to take “unprecedented steps” to curb irregular migration and take decisive action to dismantle smuggling and human trafficking.

The announcement came after three days of Mexico-US negotiations in Washington.

Mr Trump had threatened to implement duties of 5% on goods over illegal immigration at the US southern border if Mexico did not agree to his demands to tighten borders.

But after returning to the US on Friday from Europe, he tweeted: “I am pleased to inform you that The United States of America has reached a signed agreement with Mexico. The tariffs scheduled to be implemented by the US on Monday, against Mexico, are hereby indefinitely suspended.”

The US said it “will immediately expand the implementation” of a programme that returns asylum seekers, who cross the southern border, to Mexico while their claims are assessed.

Mexico will “offer jobs, healthcare and education” to those people.

Mexico has also agreed to deploy its national guard throughout the country, especially on its southern border with Guatemala, to cut the number of Central American migrants, including in groups of so-called ‘caravans’, trying to get into the US.

Migrants use a makeshift raft to cross the Suchiate river from El Carmen in Guatemala to Talisman in Chiapas State, Mexico
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Migrants use a makeshift raft to cross the Suchiate river from El Carmen in Guatemala to Talisman in Chiapas State, Mexico

President Trump said that Mexico has agreed to work to “stem the tide of migration through Mexico, and to our southern border”.

He added that those steps would “greatly reduce, or eliminate, illegal immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States”.

The president and his wife wave as they boarded Air Force One for the flight across the Atlantic
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The president has called off his threat to impose tariffs on Mexican goods

The US and Mexico will continue discussions on illegal immigration and if the measures in the agreement “do not have the expected results, they will take further actions” and announce them within 90 days.

Last month, US border officers apprehended more than 132,000 people crossing from Mexico – making it the highest monthly level since 2006.

Describing it as an “invasion”, Mr Trump had threatened to impose levies rising to 25% unless Mexico addressed the problem.

Mexican soldiers
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Mexico offered to send 6,000 troops to its southern border with Guatemala

The president had been under intense pressure from business leaders and members of his own party to suspend the tariffs, with economists warning of an increase in prices on thousands of goods imported from Mexico.

Mexico made concessions during the talks and offered to send 6,000 troops to its southern border with Guatemala.

However it said it wanted a long-term solution that would involve economic development aid.

Mexico had also prepared a list of potential retaliatory tariffs targeting products from agricultural and industrial states regarded as Mr Trump’s electoral base.

Mexican goods destined for the US
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Mexican goods destined for the US

Following Mr Trump’s announcement, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo thanked Mexican foreign minister Marcelo Ebrard “for his hard work to negotiate a set of joint obligations that benefit both the United States and Mexico.”

He added: “The United States looks forward to working alongside Mexico to fulfil these commitments so that we can stem the tide of illegal migration across our southern border and to make our border strong and secure”.

Imposing tariffs on Mexico would have resulted in the US fighting trade wars with two of its three largest trading partners, as well as unnerving financial markets already on edge about a global economic slowdown.

Last month, the US slapped tariffs of up to 25% on $200bn (£157bn) Chinese imports which prompted Beijing to levy its own tariffs on $60bn (£47bn) in American goods.

On Thursday, Mr Trump said he would decide later this month whether to hit Beijing with tariffs on an additional list of $300bn (£235bn) in Chinese goods.





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